Review: A List Of Cages by Robin Roe

25613472I mentioned in my Releases of January 2017 post that I was really looking forward to this debut novel by Robin Roe and after finishing Heartless (which I’ve reviewed here) on the release date of A List Of Cages, I took a short break from reading and then picked this book up and read it in one sitting. Literally. I couldn’t put this book down at all.

A List Of Cages follows two teenage boys: Adam, a senior in high school and aide to the school’s psychologist and Julian, a freshman who keeps skipping out on his appointments with said psychologist. Adam and Julian meet each other for the (seemingly) first time when Adam is sent to take Julian to his appointment – which is also when Adam realizes he knows Julian: they used to be foster brothers a couple of years ago.

Julian hasn’t had it easy since his parents passed away when he was a child and he was taken to live with his uncle after staying with Adam and his mother at first. Julian is a boy who has been keeping to himself and has trouble opening up to and interacting with people – Adam included.

One of this book’s main themes is friendship and kindness and it’s written about so beautifully, you can feel the love and kindness that is being spread by all of the characters. Adam’s kindness and friendship is what ultimately brings Julian into Adam’s circle of friends and helps Julian to open up and be more outgoing and also accept the kindness and love he is being shown.

I want to make sure that I talk about a topic that is described multiple times throughout this book: child abuse. I was debating whether or not I should talk about it in my review but after thinking about it for a couple of days and talking to people about it, I decided to put it in here. It’s important that you are aware that the topic of child abuse is described multiple times and at points in great detail in this book. If this is something you can’t read about – please think twice about picking this book up!

Personally, I didn’t know much going into this book and I was able to process and deal with the describtions of child abuse but it was at times very difficult – especially towards the end where I felt almost as trapped as Julian.

But overall, taking everything into consideration this book had to offer, I am really glad I picked it up and read it. I would recommend you do too – if you feel comfortable.

It has taken me a couple of days to decide how to rate this book and I think I have come to a conclusion for now: 4 stars. 

 

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